Homes in Matawan

Partitioned by Lake Lefferts and Wilkson Creek, a quaint tangle of neighborhoods on the fringes of the Bayshore, Matawan was known to the Lenape as “Mechananienk”, meaning “where two rivers become one.” Arriving first in the early half of the seventeenth century, the Dutch bastardized Mechananienk to “Matovancons” which, by the time the English took over in 1665, had become simply “Matawan.” As Scotch-Irish settlers began establishing farms and working the land during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, they christened their new community Aberdeen Township. Old Aberdeen incorporated much of what is today Old Bridge and Matawan, with Matawan breaking off and becoming an independent borough in 1895. An early industrial town, Matawan played a significant part in the history of aviation, being the site of the first operational Visual Aural Range, a radio navigation aid which revolutionized how pilots communicated with the ground.

Today, Matawan is a c…

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Homes in Hazlet

Set back, aloof, Hazlet is a verdant suburban refuge in the busy center of Monmouth County. Originally an agrarian community, old Hazlet was once a part of Raritan Township, a conglomerate of present day Bayshore towns which thrived around the rich Raritan Bay and the fertile soil which it produced in its vicinity. Populated primarily by forests and farmland, Hazlet remained in the shadow of the fishing and shipping communities around it until after the First and Second World Wars when new homes were built en masse to accommodate returning GIs, as well as those fishermen effected by collapse of fishing in the Raritan Bay beginning at the start of the twentieth century. Reincorporated finally as its own township in 1967, Hazlet is named for Dr. John Hazlett, a wealthy estate owner who built his opulent, palace-like home on what is now the Keyport-Holmdel Turnpike. Famously, the town was once the site of an expansive Heinz Ketchup factory, one of the first in New Jersey, as w…

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Homes in Colts Neck

A lush, rolling settlement in the center of Monmouth County, Colts Neck was once home to the Lenape. Four indigenous trails intersected in Colts Neck, making it a central meeting place for hunters and fishermen from the Lenape and neighboring nations. Though Europeans arrived sporadically to Colts Neck from as early as the fourteenth century, it was not until 1665 with the signing of the Monmouth Patent that the town was lastingly settled by those original patentees. These first settlers, most of them Scottish and Dutch, found themselves living not unlike the natives, hunting for food and living in humble log cabins and homes fashioned after teepees. It was not until the beginning of the 1700s that permanent structures began being erected in Colts Neck. In 1778, British and revolutionary commanders camped in and around Colts Neck during the Battle of Monmouth, as did students of the French political economist Francois Marie Charles Fourier who founded what was supposed to b…

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Homesin.com: Creating Community Connections

Homesin.com: Creating Community Connections

We at Homesin.com, this past month, have introduced an online portal that connects to towns and cities across America as part of our expedition. To accomplish this journey requires community collaboration when it comes to creating relevant content.  Accordingly, in order to fully capture the lifestyle distinctiveness and nuances of each community and, thus, properly convey each town story... one must (in the view of HomesIn.com) involve four integrated sources.

1)  Public domain data and information that pertains to the facts and figures necessary in order to provide an objective rendering of each town, city, and neighborhood.

2) Content designed to enable site visitors to personally examine their lifestyle needs as part of a "community matching" process… similar to eHarmony – but, in this case, for achieving the proper community match.

3)  Content that is transparently and ap…

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How Do I Sell An Expensive House?

You’ve lived in your house for years and taken pride in with numerous improvements. Now it is overvalued and you’re wondering, "How do I sell an expensive house?"

How Do I Sell An Expensive House?

When discussing how to sell an expensive house, there are two scenarios in which the issue comes up. The first is you have a home in an expensive neighborhood, but one which you’re asking for a price comparable to similar homes around you. In such a situation, you should be able to sell your expensive house through traditional means, either as a FSBO listing or through a realtor. The home should be cleaned up and listed with a multiple listing service. Open houses should be undertaken as well as online advertising with photographs. In this current market, you should be able to move the home fairly quickly.

The second expensive house scenario is a bit more complicated. In this scenario, you have improved your home beyond a value supported by surro…

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Homes in Farmingdale

Once a Lenape trail to the Manasquan River, the rich, wooded enclave of Farmingdale was first settled in 1830 when the construction of a Manasquan River dam led to the discovery of a miles long, triangular deposit of Marl in what was then known as Marsh’s Bog. A natural fertilizer, Marl and more specifically the ever richer New Jersey variety known as “green sand” made Farmingdale farms fruitful immediately. By 1866, the town of Farmingdale was abloom, with the Squankum Railroad and the wildly successful Marl Company centered in what was previously little more than swamp. In 1903, the town was incorporated as its own independent municipality. Then just two stores, two taverns and a handful of houses, Farmingdale has since blossomed into a sizable suburban community with all the modern amenities of home and the charm of a historic farm town.

Boasted as “today’s town with yesterday’s touch,” Farmingdale today is a vibrant residential community in the center of Monmo…

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Homes in Howell

Once an expansive mire, richly blessed in only the way the Garden State can be, Howell was home to the Lenape before being settled by New Jerseyans in the mid-1760s after the damming of the Manasquan River. As the bogs dried, the parting waters revealed naturally enriched soil which buoyed those first enterprising farmsteaders. Churches, taverns and farmsteads continued to populate the area, eventually coalescing into towns and communities like Adelphi and Farmingdale. Throughout the Revolutionary War, both British and rebel troops would be stationed throughout Howell, though the town wouldn’t be known by this name until 1801 when it was incorporated as a township and named after Richard Howell, New Jersey’s third governor. By then, Howell encompassed parts of today’s Wall Township, Brick Township, Lakewood Township, as well as several small boroughs along the Atlantic Coast and the borough of Farmingdale. Throughout the course of the twentieth century, outstretched farmlan…

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Home Buying Checklist – Paint and Stucco

Buying a home is a big investment. You should use a checklist when sizing up potential homes. In this article, we cover a home buying checklist for paint and stucco.

Paint and Stucco

The exterior of a home typically makes the biggest impression when you first view a potential buying opportunity. Many homebuyers, however, often make the mistake of looking at color schemes as the principal issue. In truth, a close review of the exterior of the prospective home can tell you a lot about the quality of the structure.

A person selling a home is not stupid. Before putting a home on the market, they are going to take steps to spiff it out to raise buyer interest and the rate you are willing to pay. There is nothing devious about such conduct. It is natural to want to put your best foot forward and a person selling a home isn’t going to act differently. This is why you want to take a close look at the exterior paint and stucco on a home.

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Curb Appeal Matters When Selling Real Estate

irst impressions matter most. This is one concept that many homeowners trying to sell their homes and first time property investors trying to sell or rent property fail to understand. Curb appeal is the first impression when it comes to a house. This is the place that you as an investor or seller want those driving buy to think of as home. For this reason you should pay careful attention and spend some degree of time and effort making the outside of the home inviting and appealing to potential buyers or renters.

One of the first things that people will notice is crumbling paint and bland or tired and faded colors on the exterior. Vinyl siding is often inviting because it is easily cleaned and reinvigorated. It also happens to be fairly low maintenance, which often appeals to buyers and renters alike. There are those however who will argue that siding detracts from the potential personality of a home. To each his or her own in this as it is a personal decision …

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How Luxury Homes And Fine Living Are Defined in Northern California

Those who are looking for El Dorado Hills real estate are often looking for a luxury home in this small bedroom community, just 25 miles east of Sacramento, California, and an hour's drive south and west of Lake Tahoe on the Nevada border. Luxury home shoppers are generally looking for a home that is in a beautiful area and that has spectacular views. They are looking for elegance, prestige, convenience and amenities that make a home more than just a home. The El Dorado Hills area, which has yet to be incorporated, meets these criteria hands down. Families began to call this area home as far back as 1962, and it remains a popular destination for homebuyers due to its clean environment and its easy access to many outdoor activities including camping, fishing and hunting. El Dorado County provides easy access to ten major reservoirs and boasts of 11,640 acres of lake water. El Dorado County is also home to 575 miles of rivers and streams and nearly one million acres of national …
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