Homes in Rumson

Clasped by the Navesink and Shrewsbury Rivers, the town of Rumson rolls to the sea, the rich, verdant greens of its knolls and spinneys meeting the deep, primordial blues of the warm intercoastal waters which separate it from Sea Bright. Known to the Lenape as Navarumsunk, Rumson’s scenic beauty was appreciated even by the original English settlers who purchased pieces of the land in 1665. The area remained, however, mostly wooded throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It was only with the mid-1800s that wealthy bankers and industrialists from New York began building filling out the coasts with sprawling summer homes and boathouses. It was around this time that Rumson Road earned its reputation as the “most beautiful driveway in New Jersey” with its quaint colonial estates neighboring newly constructed nineteenth century mansions. Rumson was incorporated as a borough in 1907 and, throughout the 1940s, 50s and 60s, developed into one of the loveliest suburbs in…

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Homes in Wall

Sprawled out at the border of Monmouth County, a vast, forested expanse spanning the Shark and Manasquan Rivers, Wall is an eminently historic town known for its quaint suburbs and natural cornucopian splendor. Between the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries, the area was a capital city in the Lenape Nation. Native hunters chased game through the lush greenery while the land’s first farmers cultivated corn, beans and squash. Though thousands lived here, little of theirs still stands. Today’s Allaire State Park was an indigenous ceremonial ground before the arrival of Europeans forced the First Nations peoples west sometime during the mid-seventeenth century. The natural richness of the area attracted scores of settlers who trickled in steadily and in ever increasing quantities beginning at around the start of the eighteenth century. Farmsteads and villages were sporadically erected from then on, with Wall finally becoming populated and developed enough to demand township in…

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Homes in Little Silver

There are many stories as to how Little Silver got its name. Some say the name was given by the first settlers who found inspiration looking out at the Shrewsbury River and its outspread creeks, their calm waters reflecting almost silver in the sun; others say the land was given the name after being purchased from the Lenape for only a meager sum of silver bullion. What’s certain is that the gentle roll of Little Silver remains as peaceful now as it was in 1667 when it was first settled. By the nineteenth century, Little Silver was primarily an agriculture town, speckled with farms, woods and saltwater marshes growing from the side of its creeks and ponds. Never a particularly large community, the opening of John T. Lovett’s famous nursery and flower garden earned Little Silver a regional reputation for its natural beauty, the softness of its lush greens a testament to the cornucopian splendor of the Garden State. Vacation homes and hotels began popping up across the town, …

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Creative Real Estate Financing

Do the creative real estate financing techniques you hear about really work? Yes and no. They likely have all worked somewhere for someone at least once. The important point is to understand the principles involved, so you can find your own creative ways to invest in real estate. Here are ten methods to get you thinking.

Use hard money lenders. Ask around or find these online. These lenders specialize in short-term loans at high interest. Typically, you use this type of financing for a "fix and flip." You can get the money fast, and if you make $30,000 on a project, who cares if you paid $10,000 interest in six months?No-doc or low-doc loans. With these loans, no (or low) documentation of your income or credit is required. You can find banks that do these online now. You'll only be able to borrow 70% to 80% of the purchase price or property value. However, if you have 10% in cash, you might be able to borrow the other 10% or 20% from a friend or the seller.Seller…
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Homes in Interlaken

A verdant expanse of soft grass and fluffed trees enveloped by Deal Lake, Interlaken was purchased from the Lenape in 1667 by Monmouth County Court Clerk Gavin Drummond. The land was initially intended to be a part of the vast Shrewsbury Township but seceded in 1849. In 1888, Dr. Francis Weld and his wife Fannie fell in love with the area, moving from their hometown of Boston to develop and live in this marvelous stretch of land which they named Interlaken Farm, named after a similarly peninsular town in Switzerland. Two years later, Dr. Weld founded the Interlaken Land Company to convert his massive 364 acre farm into an exclusive and idyllic neighborhood he had meticulously planned over the course of his first two years living in Interlaken. With streets named for English lakes and Scottish islands, his grand vision failed to consider the then extremely restrictive building codes. The Interlaken Land Company disbanded anticlimactically after only a few years, with the lan…

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Homes in Deal

Sitting along the Atlantic Ocean, moated by the Deal and Takanassee Lakes, the town of Deal was founded in 1670 by enterprising Rhode Islanders led by Thomas Whyte. Named after Mr. Whyte’s hometown in England, Deal began as a small community of merchants and craftsmen looking to break into the growing economy of colonial New Jersey and New York. Today’s Norwood Avenue, an artery running through Deal, dates back to the old Long Branch and Deal Turnpike which was constructed in 1701. While fetching the hoped for flow of trade, the Turnpike also brought unwanted guests to Deal. In 1703, one of the town’s wealthiest landowners, Gavin Drummond, was held hostage by the infamous pirate Moses Butterworth while he planned his escape from Monmouth County. Naval battles broke out off of Deal Beach not infrequently during the Revolution War. One famous instance took place on April 15, 1780, when the HMS Vulture drove a rebel brig ashore. By the nineteenth century, Deal had developed in…

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Homes in Avon By the Sea

Corseted by the Shake River and Sylvan Lake, her back to the ocean, Avon-By-The-Sea’s pristine beaches and exquisite Victorian façade nearly betray its ancient history. It was on these shores that Nels Avone, son of famed Norse explorer Leif Erikson, landed for the first time in continental North America in 1027. Though prophesies spoke of a garden of the gods where no man had ever stepped before, upon arrival Avone and company were greeted by the Lenape, whom they cautiously befriended. Aided by their new allies, the explorers formed a settlement between what is now Main Street, Second Avenue, Sylvania Avenue and Shark River. They named the settlement A-von-ee in honor of their chieftain. As generations passed and their descendants took to living among the Lenape, the area became known as A-von. It would take some 800 years for new settlers to arrive again. Previously little more than a fishing spot, the Philadelphia tobacco baron Edward Batchelor fell in love with the are…

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Choosing the Right Home- A Home Inspector’s Perspective

By Bruce Lunsford, RPI, ASHI, FABI Bruce is a Home Inspector Naples, Fort Myers Florida

As a veteran home inspector of over 16 years I’m still surprised by how often people make preventable and costly mistakes when choosing a potential home to buy. Here we’ll attempt to give potential homebuyers some ideas and guidelines to evaluate potential homes from a layman’s perspective. Hopefully we can prevent some unpleasant surprises after you’ve signed a purchase agreement.

This in no way will replace a professional home inspection, but choosing the correct home from the start can save a lot of time, money and aggravation. Too many times I’ve inspected homes with major defects that could have been visible to even the untrained eye. What we’ll do here is cover some of the basics of evaluating the home from a structural and mechanical perspective. I want to stress again – this will NOT replace a professional home inspection, but may prevent you from ent…

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Budget for Closing Costs – Property Taxes, Legal Fees and Such

You probably spent a good bit of time getting disciplined to save money for your home purchase. You need to carry this financial discipline through the escrow period or you could run into problems.

Budget for Closing Costs – Property Taxes, Legal Fees and Such

When you decided it was time to purchase a home, you went through a number of steps to get your finances in order. You probably reviewed your credit report, cut down on credit card balances and reigned in your spending. A monthly budget was probably also an item you stuck to, probably with some aggravation. Once you have an offer for a home accepted, it is important that you keep budgeting for the closing costs associated with the purchase. Here are a couple of odd little fees that can show up and drive you nuts if you are not careful.

Being required to pay property taxes can be a nasty little surprise. After all, you do not even own the home yet! The requirement, however, comes bec…

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Homes in Allenhurst

Squeezed as if under a beach umbrella between the Atlantic Ocean and Deal Lake, Allenhurst was first settled by the British in 1664. A small agricultural community, Allenhurst attracted fishermen and farmers, eventually becoming a part of the Abner Allen Farmstead, from which the town gets its name. A monumental site in the history of the US Coast Guard, it was off the coast of Allenhurst that the New Era, a clipper ship filled with mostly German emigrants, ran aground in 1854. Though not far from the beach, the squally, swelling sea proved too much for the locals to navigate through. This tragedy would be cited as inspiration for the founding of the US Lifesaving Service, the predecessor to today’s Coast Guard. An anchor from the ship discovered in 1999 now sits on the corner of Elberon and Norwood Avenues in Allenhurst memorializing those lost in the disaster. In the 1860s, wealthy New Yorkers looking to summer along the Jersey Shore began heading Allenhurst’s way. The hi…

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