Homes in Asbury Park

With its lush greens and long stretches of beach, Asbury Park was chosen in 1871 to be the site of James Bradley’s dream resort. Beginning with only a boardwalk and a few homes, Asbury Park quickly attracted scores of vacationers who in turn attracted businessmen and developers. By 1888, the boardwalk was practically crowed with attractions, including the iconic Palace Amusements indoor amusement park. Hotels followed shortly after, as did waves of new residents throughout the 1890s and early 1900s. Victorian houses began sprawling outward from the coast. Art deco architecture was introduced with the arrival of 1920s as new and glamorous shopping strips emerged. The historic Paramount Theatre was built around this time, as was the Asbury Park Grand Arcade. By the 1930s, the city was in full swing.

In the decades that followed, with the New Jersey Turnpike opening and rail traffic to the Jersey Shore slowing, Asbury Park became less of a resort and more a town. The…

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Homes in Red Bank

Named for the red soil banks of the Navesink River, Red Bank was purchased from the Lenape by the Dutch in the mid-seventeenth century. At the time, the river was more important than the land. It was not until 1736 that Red Bank, then a part of Shrewsbury Township, formed as a small but important port town on the way to Manhattan. By the early 1800s, the town had expanded into an industrial and commercial center which no longer just serviced ships, but built and stocked them with locally produced textiles, furs and other goods. As the town grew and transportation improved, a daily commute to New York City became possible and so, by the 1850s, steamboats were ferrying workers and businessmen to and from the city several times a day. In 1870, Red Bank formed its own township, only to rejoin Shrewsbury in 1879 and leave once again less than a year later. Red Bank formed as a borough finally in 1908. During the First and Second World Wars, Red Bank’s factories reached peak prod…

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Homes in Long Branch

Seated between the Shrewsbury River and Atlantic Ocean, Long Branch’s expansive shorelines made it a popular vacation destination even as long ago as the late 1700s. Gentle, lapping waves met pristine beaches which soon looked up at glittering hotels and theaters. Throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Long Branch attracted tens of thousands from across the country, including Presidents Chester A. Arthur, James Garfield, Ulysses S. Grant, Benjamin Harrison, Rutherford B. Hayes, William McKinley, and Woodrow Wilson. Today, you can still stroll through Seven Presidents Park, as well as the historic Church of the Presidents which now serves as a museum. It was only in the 1930s, amid a new wave of European immigration, that Long Branch became more than a mere resort town. Away from the shores, large estates were transformed into working class suburbs. The construction and opening of the Garden State Parkway between 1947 and 1957 saw tourists reroute to New Je…

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Homes in Keyport

Before it was Keyport, the Kearney family first settled here in 1714, building an 800 acre plantation known as Key Grove Farms. Hoping to work the land and sell timber, the Kearney’s soon discovered the immense richness of the Raritan Bay’s oyster beds and began fishing and oystering. In 1829, as Key Grove Farms was partitioned and sold, the new residents took up oystering themselves and earned the young community a spot on the map. By the outbreak of the Civil War, oysters, farming and the many new ships and ferries built at the Benjamin Terry Shipyard made Keyport a crucial center of production for the Union. In 1870, Keyport broke off from Raritan Township and became Keyport officially. In 1908, Keyport Township was made into the Borough of Keyport, which it remains today. Though the Raritan Bay’s fishing and oystering industries would crash not long into the twentieth century, Keyport continued on, becoming the site of many important developments in aviation as the Aero…

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1031 Exchange

ection 1031 in the Internal Revenue Service is a boon for a prospective investor, selling an investment property and wanting to make a profit by reinvesting in a similar property elsewhere in the country. This wonderful concept works on the principle of gain rolling from the old to the new.

There is widespread ignorance on the modalities about this exchange; as a result, 30-40 percent of property owners end paying tax during the sale. Exchange 1031 not only fructifies into essential tax savings, but also makes possible the swapping of property in the fairest manner at places of choice. No wonder that the 1031 Exchange excites the property market so much.

The new income-generating replacement property gives the investor the double gain of added income and savings from tax that would have otherwise gone to the IRS coffers.

Besides saving the buyer from a huge tax burden coming in the guise of capital gains, the instrument offers maximum im…

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10 Ways To Find Investment Properties

If you really want the best deals in investment properties, you have to increase your odds by finding more deals. Who is more likely to get a cheap apartment building, an investor that looks through the MLS listings and calls it a day, or the one that uses ten resources? Here are the ten:

Talk. Let people know you are looking and sometimes the properties will come to you. There are a lot of owners out there who want to sell, but haven't yet listed their property.Use the internet. Go to a search engine and enter the type of real estate you are looking for, along with the city you want to invest in. You never know what you might find.Drive around looking for "For Sale By Owner" signs. Owners often don't want to pay to keep the ad in the paper every week, so you won't see all properties there.Find abandoned properties. That's a pretty clear sign that the owner doesn't want to deal with the property. He might sell cheap.Find old "For Rent" ads. Call if they are a few…
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10 Ways to Buy a Home With Little or No Money Down

Sweat Equity

Sweat Equity is a way to get a home by trading work for equity in the house. This could be used for a down payment or for purchase later. This is a great technique if you are handy with tools, yard-work, and paint.

Look for fixer-uppers in neighborhoods you are interested in. Many times these homes will have a hard time selling and the owner is ready for just about any offer. You will find these houses ranging from just needing a little “cosmetic” work like landscaping or painting, to totally trashed out houses in need of some serious renovation. If you are into repairs, this is a great way to get a home for a good deal.

If you are not skilled at repairs and renovation, be careful about fixer-upper homes. They could end up costing you quite a large amount of money to pay others to fix.

I also recommend getting a home inspection so that you know what exactly you are in for before you begin.

Seller Carry-Back

Loo…

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10 Tips to Buy Real Estate Without Breaking Your Budget

Get pre-approved for your home loan. This means, fill out a loan application and go through the process of securing financing. That way, when you’re ready to seriously evaluate real estate, you’ll know exactly how much home you can afford. And you can prove to a seller that your offer is sincere.Explore creative financing options. During the home loan pre-approval process, ask about ways to get creative with your financing. Low down payment options, first and second mortgage combinations and first time buyer programs might help you afford more funding. Many lenders are now offering interest-only home mortgages; just make sure you thoroughly evaluate the terms for this type of home loan. Down payment grants are also available in some instances and might be worth investigating or discussing with your realtor.Sell your existing home first. Although selling your existing home before finding new real estate to buy can be a little nerve wracking, any inconvenience will be …
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10 Steps to Getting Top Dollar for Your Home

When you decide to sell your home you should immediately begin referring to it as a house. You’ve become emotionally attached to this place and it’s now time to say goodbye. Start detaching yourself by making some changes that will help you with the sale of the house.

You probably have accumulated a lot of clutter over the years. This must be the first step.

Unclutter your home. Start in the basement and either throw things out or rent a locker off premises to store it until you move but prospective buyers need to see what the house looks like behind all your stuff. This means going room to room and clearing everything out that makes it look junkie and disorganized. Neutralize the personal nature of your home. You may love the native tapestry on the living room wall from Bora Bora but I’ll guarantee 95% of your prospects will have it on their mind when they leave your home and not in a good way. Knick knacks and generally all things that you’ve previ…
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10 Steps to a Successful Urban Redevelopment Project

You’ve got a project with exceptional architecture, you’ve completed months of review and modification, your design team is sure this project will get significant notoriety, yet after hours of going back and forth in City Council meetings, they ask you to cut the project in half, increase the setbacks, or just drop the project altogether.

Does this sound familiar?

Developing commercial and residential projects in urban areas require special care. While some urban areas are on the verge of new developments, misunderstanding and community opposition can block even the best designs.

You can reduce risks by taking a thoughtful approach to the process. Some residents and politicians demand programs be based on trust, openness, and consensus building. This should not mean you compromise your design. Executing these ten important steps can result in strong design and a smooth process.

Consensus doesn’t mean that everyone agrees, i…

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