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Homes in Asbury Park

With its lush greens and long stretches of beach, Asbury Park was chosen in 1871 to be the site of James Bradley’s dream resort. Beginning with only a boardwalk and a few homes, Asbury Park quickly attracted scores of vacationers who in turn attracted businessmen and developers. By 1888, the boardwalk was practically crowed with attractions, including the iconic Palace Amusements indoor amusement park. Hotels followed shortly after, as did waves of new residents throughout the 1890s and early 1900s. Victorian houses began sprawling outward from the coast. Art deco architecture was introduced with the arrival of 1920s as new and glamorous shopping strips emerged. The historic Paramount Theatre was built around this time, as was the Asbury Park Grand Arcade. By the 1930s, the city was in full swing.

In the decades that followed, with the New Jersey Turnpike opening and rail traffic to the Jersey Shore slowing, Asbury Park became less of a resort and more a town. The…

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Homes in Red Bank

Named for the red soil banks of the Navesink River, Red Bank was purchased from the Lenape by the Dutch in the mid-seventeenth century. At the time, the river was more important than the land. It was not until 1736 that Red Bank, then a part of Shrewsbury Township, formed as a small but important port town on the way to Manhattan. By the early 1800s, the town had expanded into an industrial and commercial center which no longer just serviced ships, but built and stocked them with locally produced textiles, furs and other goods. As the town grew and transportation improved, a daily commute to New York City became possible and so, by the 1850s, steamboats were ferrying workers and businessmen to and from the city several times a day. In 1870, Red Bank formed its own township, only to rejoin Shrewsbury in 1879 and leave once again less than a year later. Red Bank formed as a borough finally in 1908. During the First and Second World Wars, Red Bank’s factories reached peak prod…

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Homes in Long Branch

Seated between the Shrewsbury River and Atlantic Ocean, Long Branch’s expansive shorelines made it a popular vacation destination even as long ago as the late 1700s. Gentle, lapping waves met pristine beaches which soon looked up at glittering hotels and theaters. Throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Long Branch attracted tens of thousands from across the country, including Presidents Chester A. Arthur, James Garfield, Ulysses S. Grant, Benjamin Harrison, Rutherford B. Hayes, William McKinley, and Woodrow Wilson. Today, you can still stroll through Seven Presidents Park, as well as the historic Church of the Presidents which now serves as a museum. It was only in the 1930s, amid a new wave of European immigration, that Long Branch became more than a mere resort town. Away from the shores, large estates were transformed into working class suburbs. The construction and opening of the Garden State Parkway between 1947 and 1957 saw tourists reroute to New Je…

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